Sophia Weaver

Posted by The Arc of North Carolina

We were saddened to learn of the passing of Sophia Weaver. She was known as “Sweet Sophia” and her mom, Natalie Weaver, is a tireless advocate for the rights of individuals with disabilities.

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Building Interdependence at Rooted in Advocacy 2019

Posted by The Arc of North Carolina

Author: Bryan Dooley

On March 29, 2019, The Arc of North Carolina hosted its annual Rooted in Advocacy conference in Winston-Salem. This year, the conference was designed to be fully inclusive for The Arc staff and board, the vast chapter network, parents, siblings, self-advocates, and professionals who interact with people with I/DD, instead of separate conferences on consecutive days..  The conference began with a showing of a documentary called Deej, an award-winning documentary chronicling the high school and college years of a non-speaking poet and advocate with autism, DJ Savarese, as he makes his way from public high school to Oberlin College.   As I watched the film, I couldn’t help noticing the commonalities of life with a developmental disability. Although DJ is non-speaking, I could relate to many of his experiences. He uses writing to advocate and communicate his needs and wants. He also talked about using his writing to free his people, which is the same type of language that I used to use.  
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We the Interns

Posted by The Arc of North Carolina
We are the interns of the Mission Health Project SEARCH program in Asheville, North Carolina. The program is a partnership between Mission Health, The Arc of North Carolina, AB Tech, North Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation, Vaya Health, and the North Carolina Council on Developmental Disabilities. We participate in classes that educate us on the importance of job skills, interview etiquette, professionalism on the job, and self-advocacy.
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A Better Advocate, A Better Patient

Posted by The Arc of North Carolina
Author: Bryan Dooley
 
From personal experience, I can tell you that one of the most important aspects of healthcare is having a strong and open relationship with your doctor.  Like many people with disabilities, I’ve seen a lot of doctors over the years.  Recently, I had an experience to which some people with disabilities can relate. I have a speech disability, and, in a well-meaning way, my parents began trying answer my doctor’s questions without giving me a chance to speak for myself.  It became very frustrating because I knew the answers, but I was never given a chance to speak or have the chance to build a relationship with my new physician.  My parents were beginning to take my appointment in a different direction than I wanted to go, so I became fed up and asked them to step out of the room, so I could talk to the doctor unimpeded. They got the hint, and both respectfully quieted down so I could finish my appointment.
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The Rooted in Advocacy Conference

Posted by The Arc of North Carolina
Author: Bryan Dooley
 
I’m getting excited, as one of my favorite disability advocacy events is making its annual appearance.  This will be my third time attending The Arc of North Carolina’s Rooted in Advocacy conference. This year, the conference will be held on March 29th at the Benton Convention Center in downtown Winston-Salem.  The first time I attended this event I was covering it for a local newspaper called The Camel City Dispatch.  I had a great time that year because as a journalist, I was able to interview many of the attendees and presenters.  It felt great to soak up some of their excitement towards self-advocacy.  Last year when I attended, I had the honor to address the group as a panelist representing a new initiative called the NC Empowerment Network (NCEN).  This year will a completely different experience because I won’t have any responsibility other than to enjoy and learn.  
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